The Wind Down

Grass does most of its growing during the mild, wet days of spring. Then, if you’re a blade of grass, you tend to go into a summer slump in late July and August when temps rise and little rain falls. This summer, however, our lawns entered no such slump. Lower temps and moderate rainfall throughout most of late summer kept grass growing like spring.

Finally now in mid-October, grass is starting to slow down. Though not until average daily temps sink to 50 degrees or below will growth stop. And roots will continue to grow and take up nutrients until the ground freezes. (We mowed our last lawn in 2013 on November 5.)

This is the best time of year to reseed bare spots in your lawn, overseed thin patches, and apply fertilizer. An organic fertilizer applied now will feed grass roots unlike in the spring when fertilizer tends to increase topgrowth and the number of required mows.

Judy'sLeavesSolar Mowing provides these services as well as fall leaf cleanup.

Our mulching mowers will turn some of your leaves into food for your grass and soil. We use rakes and emission-free blowers to pile the rest along curbs for pickup and/or to put in your compost area. Contact us for price info and to get on the schedule.

Emission-free mowing remains our bread and butter, but largely guided by our customers, we continue to expand into other safe and effective lawn and garden care services.

Off to a Purring Start

The 2014 growing-mowing season began this past week with temperatures that ranged from 28F to 86F. All mowers have new blades, some mowers sport new wheels, and both (blades & wheels) are turning by batteries charged by solar and wind power. “So quiet,” one new customer crooned. Here’s a look at the start of the 2014 growing-mowing season.

Dylan uses a string trimmer to neaten the border between bed and grass.

A solar-charged string trimmer is used to tidy borders between beds and grass.

We mow high (3-3.5 inches) and leave the finely chopped clippings on the grass as a fertilizer.

We mow high (3-3.5 inches) and leave the finely chopped clippings on the grass as a fertilizer.

 

We took on several mulching and reseeding jobs this spring. Here, we added a layer of compost before applying mulch to enrich the soil of this planted bed.

 

 

 

 

 

Regular mowing will weaken these common wild onion/garlic plants, which will die back in early summer. But now, you can dig 'em up, and after cleaning and chopping, throw 'em in your pasta sauce. Consider these “weeds” part of your edible landscape!

Regular mowing will weaken these common wild onion/garlic plants, which will die back in early summer. But now, you can dig ‘em up, and after cleaning and chopping, throw ‘em in your pasta sauce. Consider these “weeds” part of your edible landscape!